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20121129
20121129
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but the united states, israel and others are not celebrating. we will get the details ahead. the senate is working to change the law. the law that lets cops and the feds read our e-mails. they can just read them if the messages are more than six months old. a change coming that could affect all privacy. i am still on air today because my staff didn't win the record $588 million powerball jackpot. the deal was, if they won, obviously they were thought coming to work and the stage manager was going to anchor and i was going to hang out on their boat. but, no, there are two winners, obviously we hate them. we will talk about them unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b." >> first from fox at 3:00, the united nations general assembly hold a historic vote any moment on recognizing an independent palestinian state. it is expected to pass overwhelmingly despite opposition from the united states and israel which are in a vast majority of the u.n.'s 193 members. this measure would "reaffirm the right of the palestinian people to self determination and to independence in their
important man in the middle east and boasts an exclusive interview credited with getting israel and gaza to end fighting. let's bring in the "time" bureau chief and got the interview and joins us from tel aviv. thank you for joining us and why is morsi the most important man in the middle east? >> well, for a couple of reasons. i mean, one he is just sort of central to, you know, the sort of what they call a new sunni axis of influence. sort of powerful country is counterweight to iran emerging, you know, thinking of qatar in the gulf and turkey, certainly. egypt is just always been. it's the largest most populace county and the sort of anchor. if you're the president of egypt, you should be the most important person in the middle east and the circumstances also favoring morsi and the other reason is because he holds the sort of future of egypt in his hands right now and another revolution with what he does in the coming couple of months. >> carl, i thought it was interesting you spoke with him about his relationship with president obama. and he seems to think it's a good one. >> yeah. t
and is expected to pass. >> keep in mind the united states and israel are both opposed to the resolution. let's go to cnn foreign affairs reporter live in washington. good morning. >> good morning, brooke. israel very opposed to the move. the u.s. knows this move went give the palestinians what they want -- a state. this is largely symbolic. will have no effect on sovereignty or borders. hillary clinton met with president abbas and tried to assure him not to go ahead with the move. let's listen to what she told reporters yesterday. sfm know matter what happens it will not change what i support. the only way to get a lasting solution is to commence direct negotiations and we need an environment conducive to that. we have urged both parties to refrain from actions that might in any way make a return to meaningful negotiations -- >> now, brooke, president abbas promised to return to negotiations after the vote. but with israel so opposed to the move it doesn't seem likely. prime minister benjamin netanyahu slammed the resolution calling it one-sided saying it doesn't take into account israel's securi
and israel. supporting it are major nations such as france, russia, china, spain, denmark, portugal, ireland, britain and australia expected to abstain. it will certainly have widespread implications for the fragile middle east, bill. bill: where are the israelis on this rather? what is their response, eric? >> reporter: yeah the israelis say that status could only come from direct talks with no preconditions. those peace talks have stalled because of the continued building in the west bank and continued violence we've seen in the gaza. this does come on the 65th anniversary of the partition that created the two-state solutions, something palestinians and arabs rejected for three generations. >> direct negotiations is the dna of israeli-palestinian political process. any attempt to exert external pressure on israel would serve as a setback to those who are really interested in peace. if what you're interested in is public relations, then, this whole thing is just an exercise in futility. >> reporter: but hamas is now on board. they have rejected this until this weekend when they say they wil
to remember that when you talk about egypt's relationship to israel and the palestinians, egypt is a country of 80 million people. t a lot of them are poor. accepting palestinians working with that region is. >> reporter: fraught. >> gut reaction. at the end of the day, the man, i'm curious what rick came away feeling, one sentence what this man has to say about israel as a friend? >> i think that's still a question mark. looking at facts, he didn't open the borders between egypt and gaza to allow militants out or allow guns back in. i think looking at actions at this point is what we have to go on. >> you touched on the president's desire to turn back power in the next two weeks or two-week time frame. how is that sitting still? you've got the protests in the square. you've got that momentum that seems to be rebuilding, that led to the ouster of mubarak and the toppling of that government. do they have that concern in the back of their mind? are they seriously looking to turn this thing around and giving the power back to the people or is this stage craft? >> it's a great question. it's int
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5